Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 19 of 19

Thread: Cleaning Used Throttle Body

  1. #16
    Registered User m_stock10506's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Trinity, NC
    Posts
    332
    Actually, I only posted one photo of the left side throttle body - the photo of the exterior. The interior photos, showing the left throttle plate from front and rear views, those weren't posted because they were pretty much the same before and after conditions as the right TB. On both left and right TBs, the throttle plate is much more carbonized on the front side of the throttle plate, the side that faces the cylinder. Not really surprising since that's where the gas gets ignited. The side facing the rear, towards the air box has much less buildup.
    Michael Stock, Trinity, NC
    R1100RT, R100, R60/6

  2. #17
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    2,035
    Throttle plate discolouration might have more to do with heat. The valves are closed when fuel gets ignited.
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
    '81 R80G/S, '82 R100RS, '00 R1100RT

  3. #18
    Rally Rat
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    180
    Now that you have soaked them, take compressed air and clean out the passages.

    Looking good.

    David

  4. #19
    Curmudgeon nrpetersen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    minnetonka mn
    Posts
    618
    You guys cleaning throttle bodies - Be SURE to visually inspect the all porting etc for the big brass screws (BBS) so that they are whistle clean before reassembly. I used a Q tip with carb cleaner to clean the BBS area, and a soft wire to verify the porting was clean. It is nice to have the inside and outside clean per above, but the BBS area is critical for final setup, balancing, and freedom from surging.

    My hunch is that it is the different tradeoffs between the throttle stops and the BBS settings that causes surging, since the net airflow to the engine is optimized via the TPS on only one side of the engine. The other side has to be close to the TPS-monitored side for the mixture to be within an ignitable range on that other cylinder.

    Throttle shaft leakage could be an issue too.
    Retired w 2005 K1200LT, 2000 R1100RT, & 1975 R90/6

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •