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Thread: Entering the last "quarter" of my riding career?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycleman2 View Post
    The big thing is that you have to have a plan and be realistic. Age is an issue, I'm currently 64 and realize that my strength, reaction time etc are less/slower than they used to be and ride accordingly. Type/size of bike may also enter into the picture and I take my riding days a year at a time.

    As individuals we have to make the choice based on our own abilities and not what somebody else is doing. Yes there are 85 yr olds riding motorcycles but that doesn't mean they should be.

    I agree with all of this. My "plan" is to ride [a motorcycle] as long as I can safely [for myself & others]...then perhaps a sidecar..or maybe a scooter, and just stay local,no X-ways. I seriously doubt most 80+ yr,old's SHOULD be riding a M/C. And if I'm not able to safely,... long before that? I hope I'm smart enough to realize it...

  2. #32
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 71243 View Post
    Two, When I attend motorcycle functions ,rallies, meets, etc. The age overall of the group seems to be...not-young. Allot of grey hair is evident.
    I think the motorcycling community in general is aging ? Don't know why ?...

    Ron
    Cost is a big factor and today's younger folks have lower paying jobs, with less benefits and more educational debt. In addition, I don't think we have a "romance" with travel any more. I just don't hear of people being excited to go anywhere, which I find to be really strange.
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  3. #33
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    True about the funds issue, but also about the adventure aspect of life. Perhaps if the younger generation had the funds they would expand into more than the life of tech they live (video games, etc) and actually get out a do things.

    I dirt bike ride also, and participate in some of the large organized off-road rides here in Wisconsin. Last one I did was last October. When we stopped for a big lunch, it was kind of comical to look around the crowd. Mostly all guys my age (55), though the median age was likely about 45. But a LOT of not obviously "trim" guys walking around in full off-road gear. At least we weren't wasting a beautiful fall day walking around a mall or golf course.

  4. #34
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    I'm 67 and cannot ride modern BMWs. My old airhead was fine but it had a low center of gravity. My bikes get smaller and lower and there is probably a scooter in my future (the BMW one is still too high and heavy.) I made the decision that it was worth going into debt to do some dream riding now while I still can. Not major debt and I'm working hard in the winter to pay it off each year but enough that I can do the rides I want and pay when I can't ride anymore. I'll pay those bills with a smile. (Besides interest rates are low and I have a limit on how much I'm willing to borrow.) I can't run (old injury) but do my best to stay in shape--lots of walking and riding. When I was 64, I climbed the Macau Tower so not doing too badly for a little old lady.
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Cost is a big factor and today's younger folks have lower paying jobs, with less benefits and more educational debt. In addition, I don't think we have a "romance" with travel any more. I just don't hear of people being excited to go anywhere, which I find to be really strange.


    "I just don't hear of people being excited to go anywhere, which I find to be really strange.[/QUOTE]

    I agree 100% with that!! Just talking to folks 10-20 years younger than I....most just don't care? I've heard..."I've seen the Grand Canyon on the net" ?

    I suppose? the internet has brought the world to them?...as such they find no desire to get out and see it? ......what a shame, {IMO}

    Ron

  6. #36
    dieselpete
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    .Entering the last "quarter" of my riding career?

    Andy, thanks for starting an interesting thread.

    I'm 66 years old and lucky to be in good health. Last year I started thinking that my riding days were probably limited to another 10 years. My daily ride was a Harley police bike (FLHPI), but I use to ride sport bikes and really enjoyed it. I came to the realization that I wanted a lighter bike, but it didn't have to be boring.

    I bought a K1200R Sport and couldn't be happier. It's 300 lbs lighter than my Harley and handles so much better. Whoever said old guys should ride baggers needs to climb on a K bike!
    dieselpete
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  7. #37
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    I'm fairly convinced that a large part of Harley's popularity is due to the American rider older demographic: 45+ in years, a bit "girthy", room OVER the fuel tank for front-overhang load, bad hips/knees/back, inability to swing a leg high enough for many higher bikes, low seat height, low center of gravity, easy demeanor.

    I bet it would be much different if many of those same riders were more trim, didn't have the physical issues.

    I work part time floor sales at a BMW cycle dealership, and it is almost embarrasing to watch some riders my age, older and some younger, that cannot swing a leg over a BMW. Many look like a slug trying to slide over the seat and climb on.

    I can't talk smart too much as I have a beer/pizza donated bit of frontal overhang that I am working to diminish. Not the beer and pizza, the overhang. But I am able to stand alongside almost any BMW and swing a leg clear over the bike. So its time for me to get exercising to insure I can continue to do that and enjoy the ride.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by ANDYVH View Post
    I'm fairly convinced that a large part of Harley's popularity is due to the American rider older demographic: 45+ in years, a bit "girthy", room OVER the fuel tank for front-overhang load, bad hips/knees/back, inability to swing a leg high enough for many higher bikes, low seat height, low center of gravity, easy demeanor.

    I bet it would be much different if many of those same riders were more trim, didn't have the physical issues.

    I work part time floor sales at a BMW cycle dealership, and it is almost embarrasing to watch some riders my age, older and some younger, that cannot swing a leg over a BMW. Many look like a slug trying to slide over the seat and climb on.

    I can't talk smart too much as I have a beer/pizza donated bit of frontal overhang that I am working to diminish. Not the beer and pizza, the overhang. But I am able to stand alongside almost any BMW and swing a leg clear over the bike. So its time for me to get exercising to insure I can continue to do that and enjoy the ride.
    A lot of us, me included just don't have a long enough inseam. The BMW's that I've sat on/owned are too high for me. I can get buy OK when riding solo but once you get them loaded up with 2 folks etc then they become too top heavy. Many other bikes I've sat on from the Japanese manufactures are similar in height, so I have the same problem with them. Bad knees, backs etc come with age and there is not always a lot you can do about it. We all pay for past sins.
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  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by ANDYVH View Post
    I'm fairly convinced that a large part of Harley's popularity is due to the American rider older demographic: 45+ in years, a bit "girthy", room OVER the fuel tank for front-overhang load, bad hips/knees/back, inability to swing a leg high enough for many higher bikes, low seat height, low center of gravity, easy demeanor.

    I bet it would be much different if many of those same riders were more trim, didn't have the physical issues.

    I work part time floor sales at a BMW cycle dealership, and it is almost embarrasing to watch some riders my age, older and some younger, that cannot swing a leg over a BMW. Many look like a slug trying to slide over the seat and climb on.

    I can't talk smart too much as I have a beer/pizza donated bit of frontal overhang that I am working to diminish. Not the beer and pizza, the overhang. But I am able to stand alongside almost any BMW and swing a leg clear over the bike. So its time for me to get exercising to insure I can continue to do that and enjoy the ride.

    Very much of what you say is..unfortunately true. I have some of the extra frontal that you noted. And I have some arthritis setting in. One thing I've begun that really helps the hip range of motion that you also noted. Is simple 'hip' exercises. Frog squats,maybe some [light] weighted squats couple times a week, and a side-to-side skiing , skating type motion [body weight]. Anything to move your hips past the normal range of motion, and no power lifting required.Say 75-100 reps p/day, most days of the week.It really does seem to help in the swing a leg department.

  10. #40
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    I too am somewhat inseam "challenged", I'm 5'-6" with a 30" inseam on a good day. One thing that has certainly helped me is confidence in handling my 94 RS (stock height and custom seat), and that has come from regular training sessions as a MSF instructor. Which brings up the point that as we age the need for training and updates becomes even more apparent and needed.

  11. #41
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    Thumbs up

    If I remember correctly, Pete Tamblin, the Stayin' Safe Instructor in Georgia, is 73 years old. He is still competent beyond description and just finished the Moto Mark Motor Officer course.

  12. #42
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    Well, you've given me something to thing about. I turn 70 this year and I do wonder sometimes if I'll know when to quit. Still, I hang around with a bunch of guys the same age roughly and one of them just picked out his new Ducati Multrastrada and another goes to Arizona in the winter so
    he can ride dirt bikes. He's 82. I know I don't ride as far as I used to, but that's more a matter of circumstance. I lost my wife/riding partner in 2010 after 30 + years of traipsing all over the country. My new wife doesn't ride, so that's kind of slowed me down. If I ever retire, mybe I'll try for more cross-country trips. Mac.
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  13. #43
    2011 R1200RT ka5ysy's Avatar
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    Jeez.... what a bunch of old farts
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  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ka5ysy View Post
    Jeez.... what a bunch of old farts
    LOL We are what you thought we are
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  15. #45
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    This is my friend Jaroslav, who I call the "Goat", on Tent Ridge in the Kananaskis Valley:



    He's in his high seventies now, and still works out every day, skiis, and hikes. He had his knees rebuilt last year, but he's back doing everything, except playing squash.

    As I get older, he's my inspiration.
    Last edited by Rinty; 01-13-2013 at 12:51 AM.
    Rinty

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