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Thread: Any Pilots Here?

  1. #76
    Registered User zenduddhist's Avatar
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    Thanks for the responses! I have talked with one of the local airfields, located in Tiffin, OH. I am going to stop by tomorrow and pick up a packet of information. They told me the average total cost was approximately $7,300. Sounds reasonable, yes?

    The do not have a control tower. It's a small airport.

    Another question. I am 49. I don't think that is too old to start flying, is it?

    Finally, can anyone recommend a forum that I can join and hang out in to learn more?

    Regards,

    Chris McCarthy
    Upper Sandusky, OH
    1969 Triumph Bonneville T120R, 1972 Commando 750, 1974 Vespa Rally 200, 1974 Commando 850, 1975 Commando 850, 2010 Triumph T100 w/sidecar, 2011 BMW R1200RT, 2013 Honda CB1100

  2. #77
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    too old? never.

    49 is still young. You may be limited at that age if you want to start flying commercially though (mandatory retirement at 65 I think, have to look that one up again).

    $7500 seems reasonable if you keep it close to 40 hours, and your rental fees are lower.

    Check out the AOPA website. Lots of good information there. I don't know of any good forums off the top of my head.




    Clear Skies & Tailwinds!

  3. #78
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    Chris:

    Just a couple of comments:

    1. As mentioned above, the volume of traffic at your local field will affect how many touch and go's you can do, and you'll have to do a fair number of them. So check into that with the school. Some fields have a quota of aircraft that they allow in the circuit.
    2. Once you start training, you want to keep at it on a regular basis, because the acquired skills drop off quickly. Ideally, you would start training in the spring, train as much as possible through the summer, and try to get the license before the following winter. Flying when it's cold is no fun at all. I would try to get up two or three times a week.

    Good luck.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  4. #79
    What, me worry? GILLY's Avatar
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    I got my license on Feb 3rd (but not 1959, LOL). I thought the flying was fine in the winter, didn't have much turbulence at all like in the summer. They warm up fairly soon after getting airborne.
    87 K75S, bought new, now sold
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  5. #80
    jdubeemer jdubick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zenduddhist View Post
    Thanks for the responses! I have talked with one of the local airfields, located in Tiffin, OH. I am going to stop by tomorrow and pick up a packet of information. They told me the average total cost was approximately $7,300. Sounds reasonable, yes?

    The do not have a control tower. It's a small airport.

    Another question. I am 49. I don't think that is too old to start flying, is it?

    Finally, can anyone recommend a forum that I can join and hang out in to learn more?

    Regards,

    Chris McCarthy
    Upper Sandusky, OH
    Hi Chris,

    You might look into finding someone who teaches in Light Sport Aircraft. It might be a lot cheaper in the long run especially if you are not wanting to go great distances. As I understand it you just need a drivers licence to be legal to operate one instead of a FAA pilot certificate. They are not just ultralites but just small aircraft meant for local flying. I think even Cessna makes one. Google Cessna LSA. Being a retired pilot I don't really care much about just buzzing around but I know there are lots of folks that get a kick out of it.

    Jim in Alabama
    Grew up in Vermilion OH
    Jim Dubick
    Boaz, Alabama
    R1200RT,R100/7,KLX250
    BMW MOA, BMW MOALABAMA

  6. #81
    Registered User zenduddhist's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for the replies! I was originally thinking of getting my Class 3, but have some basic medical issues (Atrial Fibrillation controlled with meds). Anyhow, talked "unofficially" with an AME and he thought it would be a challenge to pass the medical without a special issuance. Talked to a few others and, along with this forum, have decided to get my Sport Pilot license to fly LSA. Looks like I am going to train in Columbus, OH at Ohio State University Don Scott Field. I am going there this evening to meet with them and get study info. I stopped at Lorain County Airport yesterday and met with an instructor who was very helpful. But they are almost two hours from me whereas Columbus is only an hour.

    So, it looks like I am on my way! I have been wanting to do this since I was a kid. My father had a number of friends that used to take us up several times a year. A little disappointed I won't be certified to fly in the old planes that I have dreamed of, but flying in any plane is better than not flying at all!

    Apparently, the Sport Pilot license was brought about because alot of the older pilots were having a hard time with the medicals as they aged. One interesting thing I learned was that if you fail your Class 3 medical exam you are automatically prohibited from holding a Sport Pilot license. But if you just go for a Sport Pilot license, there is no medical test... Something to keep in mind...

    Regards,

    Chris
    1969 Triumph Bonneville T120R, 1972 Commando 750, 1974 Vespa Rally 200, 1974 Commando 850, 1975 Commando 850, 2010 Triumph T100 w/sidecar, 2011 BMW R1200RT, 2013 Honda CB1100

  7. #82
    jeepinbanditrider
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    You can fly as far as you want to in a Light Sport Aircraft. With a light sport certificate though you can't fly IFR IIRC.

    Your Driver's license simply acts as your medical certificate you still need a FAA certificate as a Light Sport pilot.

  8. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Downs View Post
    You can fly as far as you want to in a Light Sport Aircraft. With a light sport certificate though you can't fly IFR IIRC.

    Your Driver's license simply acts as your medical certificate you still need a FAA certificate as a Light Sport pilot.
    Yep, cross-country is no problem with a light sport license. You are also going to spend a lot less $$$ getting the license.

    You're limited to daytime flights, 10,000 msl (or 2000 agl, whichever is higher), one passenger, and you must have logbook endorsements to fly into B, C, or D airspace, however. There are a couple of other restrictions based on business, compensation, etc.

    Have fun with it! Most of the flying that a private pilot does, with the exception of the airplane itself, falls within the restrictions of the LSA anyway Keep us posted!

  9. #84
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    Cool...I may have to look into the LSA certificate too. I have cardiac issues as well so I doubt I could pass the medical (hard of hearing, too). Back in the 70's a friend and I bought an ancient Luscombe Silvaire. I took about 15 hrs of instruction before we had issues with the plane (another story) and it took all my flying budget to fix it so I never actually got my ticket. The Luscombe was quite a handful on the ground but flying was about the second most fun thing I've ever done. It was a 1940, 40 hp Continental, wooden prop, no electrical system, stick instead of a yoke. About like a Piper Cub but side-by-side and only the wing was fabric. My father in law was an A&P so I had a cheap mechanic. Did I say how much fun it was? My wife will hate you guys for this...
    2004 R1150RT
    BMW MOA 181289

  10. #85
    Registered User zenduddhist's Avatar
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    Looking to read a couple of magazines. Which would you recommend? I already signed up for the free 6 month membership with AOPA and will receive their Flight Training magazine.
    1969 Triumph Bonneville T120R, 1972 Commando 750, 1974 Vespa Rally 200, 1974 Commando 850, 1975 Commando 850, 2010 Triumph T100 w/sidecar, 2011 BMW R1200RT, 2013 Honda CB1100

  11. #86
    jdubeemer jdubick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zenduddhist View Post
    Looking to read a couple of magazines. Which would you recommend? I already signed up for the free 6 month membership with AOPA and will receive their Flight Training magazine.
    Go by your local airport FBO and see what is laying around in the pilots lounge.
    Jim Dubick
    Boaz, Alabama
    R1200RT,R100/7,KLX250
    BMW MOA, BMW MOALABAMA

  12. #87
    Registered User zenduddhist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdubick View Post
    Go by your local airport FBO and see what is laying around in the pilots lounge.
    Yeah, I was already there, but I was hoping for something a little more current than June, 1963. Not a bad year, just saying...
    1969 Triumph Bonneville T120R, 1972 Commando 750, 1974 Vespa Rally 200, 1974 Commando 850, 1975 Commando 850, 2010 Triumph T100 w/sidecar, 2011 BMW R1200RT, 2013 Honda CB1100

  13. #88
    Registered User Rinty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zenduddhist View Post
    Looking to read a couple of magazines. Which would you recommend?
    "Flying" used to be pretty consistent, but I haven't read it much the last few years, and I see they have a new editor. My all time favourite articles were Richard Collins' columns on flying through weather in his P210.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  14. #89
    jdubeemer jdubick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zenduddhist View Post
    Yeah, I was already there, but I was hoping for something a little more current than June, 1963. Not a bad year, just saying...
    I found a copy of the BMW ON in the pilots lounge in Augusta, GA back in 96. Went out and bought a R850R and sold my Triumph. Haven't looked back.
    Jim Dubick
    Boaz, Alabama
    R1200RT,R100/7,KLX250
    BMW MOA, BMW MOALABAMA

  15. #90
    Squeaky squeaky's Avatar
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    A real thrill

    I saw Bob Hoover do this with his P-51 many years ago. Cannot verify the source of the story.

    Bob Schrader

    Just about every military pilot I know would like a chance to fly the Mustang, It is still rated number one by the military channel on TV, ahead of all the fantastic jet fighters we have now. It changed the face of WWII in Europe in that it could stay with the bombers all the way to Germany and back. It could out climb, out, turn, and was faster than the German fighters of that era.
    Old Aviators and Old Airplanes...
    This is a good little story about a vivid memory of a P-51 and its pilot, by a fellow who was 12 years old in Canada in 1967. It was to take to the air. They said it had flown in during the night from some U.S. Airport, the pilot had been tired.

    I marveled at the size of the plane dwarfing the Pipers and Canucks tied down by her. It was much larger than in the movies. She glistened in the sun like a bulwark of security from days gone by.

    The pilot arrived by cab, paid the driver, and then stepped into the pilot's lounge. He was an older man; his wavy hair was gray and tossed. It looked like it might have been combed, say, around the turn of the century. His flight jacket was checked, creased and worn - it smelled old and genuine. Old Glory was prominently sewn to its shoulders. He projected a quiet air of proficiency and pride devoid of arrogance. He filed a quick flight plan to Montreal (Expo-67, Air Show) then walked across the tarmac.

    After taking several minutes to perform his walk-around check the pilot returned to the flight lounge to ask if anyone would be available to stand by with fire extinguishers while he "flashed the old bird up, just to be safe."
    Though only 12 at the time I was allowed to stand by with an extinguisher after brief instruction on its use -- "If you see a fire, point, then pull this lever!" I later became a firefighter, but that's another story. The air around the exhaust manifolds shimmered like a mirror from fuel fumes as the huge prop started to rotate. One manifold, then another, and yet another barked -- I stepped back with the others. In moments the Packard-built Merlin engine came to life with a thunderous roar, blue flames knifed from her manifolds. I looked at the others' faces, there was no concern. I lowered the bell of my extinguisher. One of the guys signaled to walk back to the lounge. We did.

    Several minutes later we could hear the pilot doing his preflight run-up. He'd taxied to the end of runway 19, out of sight. All went quiet for several seconds; we raced from the lounge to the second story deck to see if we could catch a glimpse of the P-51 as she started down the runway. We could not. There we stood, eyes fixed to a spot half way down 19. Then a roar ripped across the field, much louder than before, like a furious hell spawn set loose---something mighty this way was coming. "Listen to that thing!" said the controller.

    In seconds the Mustang burst into our line of sight. Its tail was already off and it was moving faster than anything I'd ever seen by that point on 19. Two-thirds the way down 19 the Mustang was airborne with her gear going up. The prop tips were supersonic; we clasped our ears as the Mustang climbed hellish fast into the circuit to be eaten up by the dog-day haze.


    We stood for a few moments in stunned silence trying to digest what we'd just seen. The radio controller rushed by me to the radio. Kingston tower calling Mustang?" He looked back to us as he waited for an acknowledgment.
    The radio crackled, "Go ahead.ÔÇØ

    "Roger Mustang. Kingston tower would like to advise the circuit is clear for a low level pass." I stood in shock because the controller had, more or less, just asked the pilot to return for an impromptu air show!
    The controller looked at us. "What?" He asked. "I can't let that guy go without asking. I couldn't forgive myself!"

    The radio crackled once again, Kingston, do I have permission for a low level pass, east to west, across the field?"
    "Roger Mustang, the circuit is clear for an east to west pass."
    "Roger, Kingston, I'm coming out of 3000 feet, stand by."
    We rushed back onto the second-story deck, eyes fixed toward the eastern haze. The sound was subtle at first, a high-pitched whine, a muffled screech, a distant scream.

    Moments later the P-51 burst through the haze. Her airframe straining against positive Gs and gravity, wing tips spilling contrails of condensed air, prop-tips again supersonic as the burnished bird blasted across the eastern margin of the field shredding and tearing the air.


    At about 500 mph and 150 yards from where we stood she passed with the old American pilot saluting. Imagine. A salute! I felt like laughing, I felt like crying, she glistened, she screamed, the building shook, my heart pounded.

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