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Thread: Scooter camping

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  1. #1
    Registered User PittsDriver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012

    Scooter camping

    Being more of a car camper myself, all of my gear is pretty bulky and heavy though great quality stuff. I may be spending a week or 10 days on the road mostly camping off of my K16GT and I was wondering if any of you had any recommendations for some stuff that packs up small, light, and works well for say, 3 season camping. No cooking or living stuff. Just a tent, pad, bag, chair, ground cover/footprint. I've got great little LED lights - no help required there. It's been several years since I've shopped and there's a whole bunch of new very lightweight small stuff out there. Any tips for scooter camping?

  2. #2
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Somerville, MA
    Search this site for tent threads, lots of recommendations here.

    Backpacking stuff works well. If you have an REI or similar large outdoor place with a focus on human powered travel, you can check out tents that are set up and get inside them. Weight isn't as important as with backpacking, so you don't HAVE to go "ultra-light".

    The size of the stuff you get depends on the volume of the luggage on your bike and how much you are willing to strap to the outside. Compression bags are great for shrinking your load.

    Several companies make devices that turn sleeping pads into chairs, e.g. , but the Kermit chair is a perennial favorite with the Beemer crowd.

    Down sleeping bags are lighter, pack smaller and last longer than synthetics of the same temperature rating.

    Heavy plastic sheeting from the hardware store works as well, last a long time and is much cheaper than tent-specific ground cloths. One roll can make ground cloths for all your tents.

    On an MC you can carry a larger/heavier tent than you'd carry on your back. I recommend a free standing model as you don't need as many stakes and you can pick it up and move it and shake it out before you break camp.

    Same thing for pads, more weight gives more comfort but also larger size.
    Justin in Somerville, MA
    76 R75/6, 78 P200E, 63 VBB
    Lots of bicycles

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Manitowoc, Wisconsin
    I would also recommend investigating tents that are rated for at least one more person than you intend having in the tent. That way room for not just you, but at least some of your "stuff."
    F.O.G.Rider, Rounder #6,
    BMWRA Wisconsin Region Rep

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Eastern KY
    3,358 & eBay & craigslist & REI & read Backpacker magazine reviews of equipment online

  5. #5
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    SW Iowa
    Post number 2 has some very good advice, but for me I still kept an eye on weights when buying equipment because it all adds up.
    Here's a link for REI which has a store locator button at top of the page.

    My wife and I almost always camped on bike trips from 1978 to 2003 and we never carried chairs because of the extra weight and bulk, plus we usually had a picnic table to sit on.
    This year going to the National, I decided to buy a couple lite weight chairs (Getting old )
    Here's a thread that mentions a few compact and lite weight chairs.

    If you use REI, they have a outlet section that may save you some money.
    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  6. #6
    Motorsickle Rider brisco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    De Soto, KS
    Take a look here.
    These guys get it and carry great products for motorcycle camping.
    Also check out some of their articles in the FAQ section.
    Kansas. Eleven curves in three hundred eighteen miles...
    '09 R1200RT
    Iron Butt Assoc. #47865

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