Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: R75/6 Commute

  1. #1
    Bill Lumberg 175781's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    261

    R75/6 Commute

    After only short weekend rides, I finally got around to swapping the RT for the R75 for a days commute. Every imperfection in the pavement resulted in notable tracking of the front tire, which made for a very intense 76-85mph commute. Missed the comfort and jet-like feel of the R1150RT, but the old school R75 still turns heads.
    R75/6, 2004 R1150RTA.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    726
    What was you steering damper set to? With the bad roads around here, my front end will wander unless set to "2", especially on the rain grooves.
    Virginia Beach
    current:14 R1200RT 75 R60/6
    past: 11 R1200RT 10 R1200RT 03 R1200CLC

  3. #3
    Rally Rat
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Arlington, TX
    Posts
    159

    R75/6

    Couple of things to consider. Are the steering head bearings in good shape, greased and adjusted correctly? What brand tire are you using and how old is it?
    Just saying.
    Boxerbruce

  4. #4
    Nickname: Droid
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    Posts
    2,352
    Also, those vintage style tires popular for older bikes, like the type with multiple constant grooves around the tire parallel to the path of travel, are MUCH more reactive to anything like a groove in the pavement. Modern tire styles with almost NO circumferential grooves do a LOT to reduce that "hunting/tracking" effect of the old style tires.

    Note that none of the current tire styles feature constant, unbroken, circumferential grooving. Many in fact have solid rubber down the center, with angled grooves with large solid sections between the angled grooves. Fewer grooves, larger solid block sections also mean less tire squirm reaction.

  5. #5
    Bill Lumberg 175781's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    261
    I have a fairing, which I believe was not tuned correctly. I think this contributed greatly to the death-wobble that seemed just below the surface. Never been that bad. Next time I do a bombing run on the R75 and leave the fighter jet at the house, I'm going to do it sans fairing and see how that feels. I'll keep the other suggestions in mind too. Particularly about the steering damper. I don't even know how that works or what a "normal" setting is.
    R75/6, 2004 R1150RTA.

  6. #6
    Rally Rat
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Arlington, TX
    Posts
    159

    R75/6

    Quote Originally Posted by 175781 View Post
    I have a fairing, which I believe was not tuned correctly. I think this contributed greatly to the death-wobble that seemed just below the surface. Never been that bad. Next time I do a bombing run on the R75 and leave the fighter jet at the house, I'm going to do it sans fairing and see how that feels. I'll keep the other suggestions in mind too. Particularly about the steering damper. I don't even know how that works or what a "normal" setting is.
    The steering dampner on your /6 has a knob at the top with three positions. 0 is off with positions 2 and 3 pushing the end of the shock farther from the pivot point of the steering stem.
    It really isn't all that effective IMHO.
    The biggest concern with the steering head is that the bearings are lubed, not nothced, and adjusted correctly! If not, then the dampner won't do anything, or even mask a bearing problem.
    Boxerbruce

  7. #7
    advrider.com
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,192
    FWIW, I took the steering damper off my /6's and I don't have a problem cruising at 80mph all day long. I have Metzeler ME tires and (I think) a properly adjusted steering bearing setup.. and no fairing.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Northern Front Range, CO
    Posts
    6,448
    Quote Originally Posted by 175781 View Post
    I have a fairing, which I believe was not tuned correctly.
    huh?

    whatever it is you mean by that... it ain't the fairing. its either the front tire (see Andy's post), or possibly steering head bearings. my vote is tire, especially if you have something like the old RB2 from Conti. could be suspension too- please tell us you are not still on the 35+ yo original shocks....
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  9. #9
    Nickname: Droid
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Green Bay, WI
    Posts
    2,352
    Let's not forget the swingarm bearings, just as important as the steering head bearings in regards to high speed stability. I would go in this order to resolution:
    1. Tire tread style: old style/vintage tires like the Conti RB2 will "hunt" on every crack/feature parallel to the path of travel.
    2. Old/aged tires, simply not a good/safe idea, upgrade to modern rubber.
    3. Chassis alignment, make sure nothing is tweaked/busted/broken welds.
    4. Steering head bearings, setting, proper grease, preload.
    5. Swingarm bearings, same as steering head bearings.
    6. Steering head damper, unless the previous five items are addressed and right, all a steering head damper really does is mask the real issues.

    The older chassis do flex a lot more than the rigid chassis we have come to love/expect since the early 90s. I recall a frightening high speed wobble on my 76 R100RS at 110mph, oscillating left to right about five feet wide. I very slowly backed off the throttle until it stabilized again at 105 and then backed down to the speed limit. Change of shorts at the next stop. That year I bought my current 94 R1100RS.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    726
    Au contraire - the damper adjustment at postition 2 is quite effective on gravel, slippery surfaces and rain grooves - just sayin'...
    Virginia Beach
    current:14 R1200RT 75 R60/6
    past: 11 R1200RT 10 R1200RT 03 R1200CLC

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    1,963
    The milled upper triple does wonders for the twin shock Airheads

  12. #12
    Bill Lumberg 175781's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    261
    Yes, it was the fairing, which wasn't tuned properly. The fairing I have on this bike is removeable, fork/handlebar mounted, and was thrown on at 5am just before departure. When the fairing is off, the mounts stay on, but when they're not bearing the fairing, they can shift position and alignment. This resulted in a fairing that wasn't pointing perfectly straight forward. This caused unequal pressure and created an effect far worse than that you'd expect from this sort of fairing. The bike runs fine without the fairing, and it runs fairly well with the fairing back in adjustment.
    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfish1100 View Post
    huh?

    whatever it is you mean by that... it ain't the fairing. its either the front tire (see Andy's post), or possibly steering head bearings. my vote is tire, especially if you have something like the old RB2 from Conti. could be suspension too- please tell us you are not still on the 35+ yo original shocks....
    R75/6, 2004 R1150RTA.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •