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Thread: California BMW's any different?

  1. #16
    Registered User David13's Avatar
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    I just don't see any need for a middle man. I like to deal direct. I don't see any need for a middle man to hold the money either.
    Real estate? Escrow? Sure.
    But a bike? You put the money in my hand, and I put the title in yours.
    Or vice versa if I am buying.
    I'm all in favor of fly n buy n ride it home. If it's the right bike. Call up the owner and see what it sounds like. Get someone in the area to look at it for you. Then go.
    dc

  2. #17
    Themason 42906's Avatar
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    Here's the deal. When the first 200 K-100's came to the US in September 1984 they were 49 state legal bikes. None of these were sold in California. After the first 200 K-100s came a 50 state version was introduced in early 1985. Btw, those 49 state bikes shared the same state of tune as the European models and had a nice top end rush and seven more ponies the later 50 state bikes lacked.
    The differences between the two are cam duration (284 degrees intake and exh for the 49 state bikes vs 240 degrees intake and exh for 50 state bikes), the routing of evaporative emissions through a one way valve from the tank to the engine block ( ! ) and a restricted fuel opening with a spring loaded flap that thankfully is easily removed. From then on I am not aware of a single BMW model that was not 50 state legal from model introduction. Swiss K-100's, at least initially, had 256 degrees of cam timing. If you buy replacement cams for your old K-100 today, BMW only sells the 284 degree cams.
    Prior to the K bike, 1981 and later /7 models sold in the US had lower compression and softer cam timing than European models and they had something called "Pulse Air" pulling crankcase vapors into the exhaust stream to be burned. '77 and '78 R-100S and RS models could still come to the US with 9.0 to 1 compression, Sport cams and 40 mm exhausts. Boy did those bikes run nice!
    If my memory serves BMW currently sells bikes in the same state of tune world wide. All their bikes meet everyone's emissions standards. This simplifies production.
    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want.

  3. #18
    Registered User David13's Avatar
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    Wow. There's some good technical detail.
    I think also some of the auto manufacturers are going to the simplified production as well, rather than building several different models for sale in different markets.
    Maybe not at the global level, but at the national level.
    dc

  4. #19
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    Your only problem would be bringing a bike/car into California, without that funny california emissions sticker could be difficult to register

  5. #20
    Themason 42906's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by t6pilot View Post
    Your only problem would be bringing a bike/car into California, without that funny california emissions sticker could be difficult to register
    The vehicle code permits non-CARB cars and bikes to be registered in California if they have at least 7500 mils on them. The law was written this way to prevent California car dealers from selling a car just over the border in Nevada to avoid paying California sales taxes on the full value of a new car (believe me, many dealers pulled this scam, delivering cars just feet over the state line, especially motor homes which are quite expensive) and to prevent customers from buying non compliant new cars out of state.
    There are a couple of other exceptions for people who were legitimately residing out of state and who move to California and establish residence here, and for California residents who, while working out of state, lose their car, bike or truck due to an accident or theft and have to replace it immediately so they can continue to work and then return to California. The state also dings you an additional fee to register a non compliant vehicle here the first time.
    It is less of a factor than you might think. Most cars and bikes are sold as 50 state legal vehicles (Harley Davidsons are an exception). Car dealers and rental car companies basically demand this so they can move cars around dealerships as customer demand dictates and not worry about having to only send CARB legal cars to be sold in California. I'm sure Harley wishes they had manufactured all of the Street Rods as 50-state legal bikes so they could move the few remaining left over '06 and '07 Street Rods lingering in places like Pennsylvania to California dealers where they might actually sell. When I bought my cousin's '93 Audi a couple of summers ago it was already CARB legal so there was no drama registering it here.
    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want.

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