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Thread: Whats the fuss about tire changes?

  1. #1
    It's a way of life! oldnslow's Avatar
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    Whats the fuss about tire changes?

    I've changed countless dirt bike tires in my days, and hated it every time I did it. It was usually done in the pit area, in a hurry, and the wheel full of mud and dirt.

    So today when I decided to give a try at my K100 tires, I was ready to be pissed off.

    Cripes, what a joy to work on. The beads were a little tough to break free, but after that, the tire spooned right off with ease! No gobs of goo inside the tire, no nasty tube to pull out, my hands didnt even get dirty.

    A few well placed swipes of tire mounting goop on the bead of the new tires, a good cleaning of the rim bead with scotch brite, and the new tires practically fell into place! No rim lock to mess with, no valve stem to feed through the rim, and no tube to pinch or poke holes in!

    I did both wheels, (remove from bike and replace) in less that 90 minutes! No wheel stand, just laying on the garage floor.

    Am I missing something? Where is the frustration factor? Tire changing used to be a 'tool throwing, ground kicking, cuss like a sailor event' !
    Mike Davis
    "Old n Slow" It's a way of life!
    1985 K100RT

    1998 R1100RT

  2. #2
    Registered User mneblett's Avatar
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    An '80's/'90's K100/R100 tire is a breeze.

    Try it on a 190/55R17, in a shallow drop-center rim. You'll learn new vocabulary.
    Mark Neblett
    Fairfax, VA
    #32806

  3. #3
    Registered User dmftoy1's Avatar
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    I don't know even those aren't too bad if they're warm and you keep the offside bead in that shallow drop center. .

    Did a tubed wheel last night and it was brutal. Then read nomars lit and it said mounting tube tires might not be possible. (breaking down it did fine but I had to use spoons to get new tire on!)

  4. #4
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
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    My vocabulary does get more creative every time I change a tire.

    Some tires have been easy and some not, same bike, same wheels, different tire brands.
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  5. #5
    Registered User 58058D's Avatar
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    I am with Mark....did my 190/55 on a cool day, used the no-mar extra hand and still needed a buddy...front was pretty reasonable, though.
    Jim Douglas '00 K1200RS >135,000 miles my primary bike again,
    Gone: '09 K1300S sold @ 22k mi, '93 K1100RS traded @ 78k mi, '85 K100RS sold @ 44k mi
    '06 Kaw 650R track bike sold
    http://www.seagullbb.com/

  6. #6
    It's a way of life! oldnslow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dmftoy1 View Post
    I don't know even those aren't too bad if they're warm and you keep the offside bead in that shallow drop center. .

    Did a tubed wheel last night and it was brutal. Then read nomars lit and it said mounting tube tires might not be possible. (breaking down it did fine but I had to use spoons to get new tire on!)
    I have a small block of wood I jam between the rim and tire to keep the bead in the drop center.
    Mike Davis
    "Old n Slow" It's a way of life!
    1985 K100RT

    1998 R1100RT

  7. #7
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    I think changing the rear tire on a 1200 series bike would answer your question about what the fuss is about. I have a No Mar and changing tires is now a simple event, but changing a tire on some of our bikes would be a many expletive deleted affair if done on the garage floor.
    Kevin Huddy
    Tm Pterodactyl MT Outpost

  8. #8
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    A rear ME880 on a K12LT would cause some choice words if it were not for the NoMar. Spoon bars a must and lot's of wood blocks as you spoon those stiff bad boys on. Even with that set up, some days it's just a bear. I'm spoiled now and would hate to do it on the floor.

    I set tires out in the sunlight and "usually" have no issues.

    I have changed a tube on a HD and a 650 Thumper on the roadside. Once the tires are run in, they come off/go back on the rim a tad easier...sometimes
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  9. #9
    On the Road
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    Quote Originally Posted by brewmeister View Post
    The No=mar tire changer has good tips on tire changing that can be used even though you may not have a changer like it.see their web site.
    another vote for watching the No Mar video. techniques shown works on any type changer. including manual with levers. note stress relief procedure and where and how to lube.

    makes a HUGE difference if you follow these steps



    same for balancing your wheel

  10. #10
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Yep;

    Some of the newer rims are NOT friendly and even BMW shops fight'em on the rim! I've done my own and watched too many times. The older bikes are much easier. My GSA1200 spoked rear wheel is a fight every time, having done dozens of'em. Spooning these on would be near impossible without extended LONGER industrial spoons. Randy

  11. #11
    Registered User
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    you want frustrating? i tried changing my buddy's rear tire for his Buell Lighning. there is NO dish to that rim, the sucker is flat from edge to edge! I gave up; he brought it to a shop that put the new tire on for $17, as i had already gotten the old one off and the first side on of the B'stone.

    i use a combo of a H-F stand (great bead breaker and rim holder) with MoJo blocks, a MoJo lever, and some Yamalube tire soap. As long as i remember to use the M-J lever as intended (read that as: "re-read and follow the directions"), it (usually) works just fine.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  12. #12
    Registered User lkchris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dmftoy1 View Post
    Did a tubed wheel last night and it was brutal.
    They are these days for sure ... maybe mostly because the tires are built to be tubeless.

    A real genuine tube-type only tire on my R80G/S practically goes on/comes off with no tools at all.
    Kent Christensen
    21482
    '12 R1200RT, '02 R1100S, '84 R80G/S

  13. #13
    Certifiable User Mike_Philippens's Avatar
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    I'm no expert, but I've seen some people doing a tyre change roadside without all the fancy equipment and it looked like a simple job. Let me paint a picture for you:
    Morrocan desert, 40 degrees Celsius and you've had about 3 flats already... The bike is a Yamaha Tenere and the tyres are Michelin Desert, and those are tough tyres. Even without inflated tube hard to deform by hand.
    So, like I said, the guy had some experience and it was (not literally with 40 degrees) no sweat. Within 20 minutes the tube was changed. The only 'tools' we had were some DIY tyre lifters we made at home. Extra long ones.

    I guess it's a job you need some experience in like the topic starter. If you know how to do it, you don't need fancy stuff.
    -=- if you always see the road ahead of you, it's not worth the trip -=-

  14. #14
    Enjoy The Ride saddleman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike_Philippens View Post
    I'm no expert, but I've seen some people doing a tyre change roadside without all the fancy equipment and it looked like a simple job. Let me paint a picture for you:
    Morrocan desert, 40 degrees Celsius and you've had about 3 flats already... The bike is a Yamaha Tenere and the tyres are Michelin Desert, and those are tough tyres. Even without inflated tube hard to deform by hand.
    So, like I said, the guy had some experience and it was (not literally with 40 degrees) no sweat. Within 20 minutes the tube was changed. The only 'tools' we had were some DIY tyre lifters we made at home. Extra long ones.

    I guess it's a job you need some experience in like the topic starter. If you know how to do it, you don't need fancy stuff.
    Can you do that without leaving a single scratch on the rim ?.
    Dave
    2004 Black LT
    2000 Canyon Red LT
    V.P. BMWMOA Club 220

  15. #15
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Most street tires are pretty soft in the sidewalls compared to a DS or dirt tire and are thus a lot easier to deal with. Next time my GS is due to change the K60s, come on by and I'll show you what a real tire is like to fight off the rim.

    Still, not so bad that I want to pay the going rates to have the dealer do them.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

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