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Thread: Robb leaves BMW

  1. #46
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    Interesting...

    If BMW AG decides to market a "Low Rider", I'm in.

    I actually like the design, a lot, and I'd trade/sell my H-D for a BMW "Low Rider"...

    Cheers,

    B

  2. #47
    Registered User TOMRUNNING's Avatar
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    Not for Long

    Munich. Edgar Heinrich (53) will be taking over the BMW Group's BMW Motorrad Design Studio as of July 1st 2012.

    I wonder if they told him he would only have the job for a couple of years?
    Tom Running, 51141 Greenville, WI
    "Love is when you like something as much as your motorcylce." Sonny Barger in Hells Angels
    by Hunter S. Thompson 1966

  3. #48
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    We'd like an F800RT please.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  4. #49
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    http://www.motorcyclenews.com/en/MCN...ef-leaves-bmw/ says

    A BMW source said Robb left following a disagreement with ÔÇ£another designerÔÇØ.


  5. #50
    100,000+ miler 32232's Avatar
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    Dave

    '06 Triumph Scrambler (Trans-Labrador veteran)

  6. #51
    Ute's Chauffeur
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    +1 on a Lo rider, of course I loved my R1200C which my wife never lets me forget I should not have sold. A Lo Rider would blunt the pain.

  7. #52
    It is what it is. Bud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Melt down? I thought they sold them to MOA members! Maybe I was wrong.
    Haven't been here for a while and have to say that I just spewed Diet Coke all over my laptop due to your remark Paul. Very, very, very funny.
    I used to post here, but now I don't.

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by 32232 View Post
    From the link, BMW styling looks like it will be in good hands;

    During his time with BMW Motorrad, Edgar Heinrich was responsible for such vehicles as the first 4-valve boxer models R 1100 RS and RT, the K 1200 S and R, the HP Megamoto and the victorious Paris-Dakar racing machines. The successful R 1150 GS and R 1200 GS were also created on his drawing board.

    Under his direction, the motorcycle design team created the S 1000 RR, the F 800 / 650 series, the G 450 X and also the BMW Custom Concept study. Heinrich was even involved at the start of the design development of the 6‑cylinder touring bikes and the new maxi-scooters.

    Motorcycles take up a large part of his leisure time, too. His passions include modifying sports bikes, restoring and collecting vintage models and in particular riding motorcycles himself – both on and off the road.


    Speaking with David Robb early one morning at a rally a few years ago was quite interesting. He said he doesn't really design the bikes but styles the chassis/engine/drivetrain platform that's developed by the other engineers. He has to work around what's given to him more than one would think.
    14 R1200GSA, 93 R100R. No car is as fun to drive as any motorcycle is to ride.

  9. #54
    rabid reader dbrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    http://www.motorcyclenews.com/en/MCN...ef-leaves-bmw/ says

    A BMW source said Robb left following a disagreement with “another designer”.

    Perhaps Adrian van Hooydonk. One doesn't usually win disagreements with one's superior.
    David Brick
    Santa Cruz CA
    2007 R1200R

  10. #55
    100,000+ miler 32232's Avatar
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    I believe posts 58-61 of this thread may be a result of the hacking of this site.

    I see they have now been removed.
    Last edited by 32232; 02-05-2012 at 01:34 PM. Reason: Posts deleted by Moderator
    Dave

    '06 Triumph Scrambler (Trans-Labrador veteran)

  11. #56
    2011 R1200RT ka5ysy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R80andR100RT View Post
    If he was responsible for all the wierd impractical designs that came from BMW since the airheads demise then I for one am glad he's gone.

    BMW makes large, ungainly, heavy motorcycles. Maybe their management is realizing that the emerging markets are in China, India, Indonesia, etc.

    Ummm... are you maybe confusing Beemers with Harleys ?? (K12LT excepted )
    Doug, 2011 R1200RT Polar Metallic
    MSF #127350 NAUI #36288

  12. #57
    Registered User Blacque Jacque Shellacque's Avatar
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    Perhaps Robb was fired for the never ending Final drive debacle?

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpongeBob Squarepants View Post
    Perhaps Robb was fired for the never ending Final drive debacle?
    (if that's a "serious" question/ speculation, rather than a troll), the answer is no.
    Within BMW Motorrad, Robb's responsibility was "design," distinct from "engineering."

  14. #59
    Ambassador at Large JIMSHAW's Avatar
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    Design term seems misunderstood here

    Quote Originally Posted by milo View Post

    Speaking with David Robb early one morning at a rally a few years ago was quite interesting. He said he doesn't really design the bikes but styles the chassis/engine/drivetrain platform that's developed by the other engineers. He has to work around what's given to him more than one would think.
    Right.

    A lot of riders don't understand what the term "design" means in motorcycles. At BMW, the engineers are responsible for the engine, drive train, chassis, and most of the mechanically functioning parts of the bike. The designers are responsible for the appearance of the bike. They will request that minor changes be made to enhance the appearance or usefulness of the "skin." But, their input is about making the bike look right, given the engineers work, which was specified by marketing and budget.

    David tried to clarify this division of responsibility on many occasions, but I saw him get a lot of dull, uncomprehending stares from riders when he did.

    On two occasions, I was privileged to spend a day or three with David. On the first occasion, I was pleasantly surprised to walk with him among the hundreds of BMWs at a Rally in Missoula. He would pass every stock or near-stock BMW, but would stop and closely examine any bike that had a serious modification, particularly of shape or form. On a couple of stops, he got down on the ground to better observe some modified bike. He never seemed critical; he was observing other people's ideas.

    He seemed to be the most open minded of BMW executives, and an American designer who succeeded for eighteen years as a department head in a German company. His designs were popular with buyers, and went a long way toward differentiating the models between mostly similar engines, drive trains, and chassis.

    Why David left is a matter of conjecture. However, I am inclined to think it was his decision, for whatever reason.


  15. #60
    Dances With Sheep GREGFEELER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimshaw View Post


    Right.

    A lot of riders don't understand what the term "design" means in motorcycles. At BMW, the engineers are responsible for the engine, drive train, chassis, and most of the mechanically functioning parts of the bike. The designers are responsible for the appearance of the bike. They will request that minor changes be made to enhance the appearance or usefulness of the "skin." But, their input is about making the bike look right, given the engineers work, which was specified by marketing and budget.

    David tried to clarify this division of responsibility on many occasions, but I saw him get a lot of dull, uncomprehending stares from riders when he did.

    On two occasions, I was privileged to spend a day or three with David. On the first occasion, I was pleasantly surprised to walk with him among the hundreds of BMWs at a Rally in Missoula. He would pass every stock or near-stock BMW, but would stop and closely examine any bike that had a serious modification, particularly of shape or form. On a couple of stops, he got down on the ground to better observe some modified bike. He never seemed critical; he was observing other people's ideas.

    He seemed to be the most open minded of BMW executives, and an American designer who succeeded for eighteen years as a department head in a German company. His designs were popular with buyers, and went a long way toward differentiating the models between mostly similar engines, drive trains, and chassis.

    Why David left is a matter of conjecture. However, I am inclined to think it was his decision, for whatever reason.

    For all the reasons Jim states above, and for the success his designs have seen in the market place (just look at the styling of the GS wanta-bes), I believe he will be a big loss to BMW. No one is irreplaceable, but some people do leave a noticeable hole in the water for a while.
    Greg Feeler
    BMW MOA Director & Ambassador
    1972 R75/5, 1990 K75, 1990 K1, 1992 K75S, 2003 K1200RS

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