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Thread: Question for Mr. Voni

  1. #16
    3 Red Bricks
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    I use Ate Super Blue Racing brake fluid in all my bikes, cars, and race car.

    I use it in the race car because it has one of the highest dry boiling points of any readily available reasonably priced Dot 4 brake fluids.

    But I use it in the bikes and cars because it has the highest WET boiling point.

    Wet boiling point is the reason that you must change brake fluid so often. Brake fluid is hydroscopic, meaning it absorbs water. Water boils at 212 degrees. Moisture in brake fluid dramatically reduces the boiling point of the fluid. A higher wet boiling point is a higher margin of safety in fluid that is approaching (or past) its change interval. Ate suggests a longer change interval because of the extra margin.

    The other reason I like this fluid is because they make an identical fluid in amber color called Type 200. When you do changes you alternate between the blue and the amber. That way you know when you have completely flushed the system.

    It is available at many auto parts store (though some may have to special order the type 200).

    http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/acces...tail.jsp?ID=21




    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

  2. #17
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfish1100 View Post
    if your stock brake lines are not SS, they most definitely will self-destruct. die a slow death from old age, actually- but they certainly have a finite life span. AndyVH will likely chime in with more specifics as to process and causation- but it is a mistake to think that rubber lines will last forever.
    That is also true of the older SS lines. But... the stock Stahlflex lines on my bike have a PTFE inner, stainless mid, and a some kind of clear plastic outer covering. Certainly, they have a finite life span, but longer than the older stainless covered rubber lines.

    When I flush the system (approx every 2 years) the fluid coming out looks exactly the same as the fluid going in. I really need to find a different color brake fluid. Maybe that ATE stuff mentioned above. The brake lines look good from an external inspection point of view, too.

  3. #18
    Registered User cjcs's Avatar
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    One thing worth mentioning about ATE Super Blue brake fluid is that it will turn plastic
    brake reservoirs, and vacuum brake bleeder canisters blue, the color of the fluid.
    No big deal but if you later switch to a fluid thats lighter in color, it might make it
    harder to see the fluid level.
    Carl S.
    BMWMOA #11500

  4. #19
    3 Red Bricks
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJCS View Post
    One thing worth mentioning about ATE Super Blue brake fluid is that it will turn plastic
    brake reservoirs, and vacuum brake bleeder canisters blue, the color of the fluid.
    No big deal but if you later switch to a fluid thats lighter in color, it might make it
    harder to see the fluid level.
    Has not happened in six years on 3 different K75Ss. Not even a hint. The reservoirs are like new inside.

    Might be different plastic on your model bike. Which bikes have you had this experience with?

    Or the fact that I alternate colors might clean the blue off before it permanently stains it.




    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

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