Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 117

Thread: got the R90 out in the sun

  1. #61
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pismo Beach, CA
    Posts
    3,137
    Out-Standing! I think yer holding back on us; that looks like you've been doing this for a while. But no cookies for you until you replace that tray. Come to think of it, cookie sheets might be cheaper than a sheet of Al.

    I've bought some stuff from TM Technologies in the past. They have great on-line tutorials. Here's one on annealing aluminum that should come in handy > http://www.tinmantech.com/html/alumi..._continued.php
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  2. #62
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    13,756
    I'm still wondering how all this is going to work out. I watch what they do on American Chopper with the welding, pounding, forming of sheet metal to form a tank. Maybe in the end the details get lost on TV and/or is covered in paint. But it would sure seem difficult to get the metal smooth enough so that the appearance/paint didn't amplify all the undulations in the metal.
    Kurt -- Forum Administrator ---> Resources and Links Thread <---
    '78 R100/7 & '69 R69S & '52 R25/2
    mine-ineye-deatheah-pielayah-jooa-kalayus. oolah-minane-hay-meeriah-kal-oyus-algay-a-thaykin', buddy!

  3. #63
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tularosa, NM
    Posts
    666

    A little rough is historically accurate. . .

    I agree with Kurt about how difficult it might be to get it absolutely smooth. That said, take a look at some of the old pix of those "dustbin" racing fairings of yore -- obviously one-off, and YES! obviously done by human hands! (Sadly, some dustbin fairings were prone to causing the bike to take to the dirt in sidewinds, but not because they were handmade.)

    Watch out for cookie crumbs in the tank --

    Brother, you've got a "set" to take this project on, and GOOD ON YOU!

    FYI, the excellent book, Shopcraft as Soulcraft addresses the current lack of shop classes in schools. When I grew up in Arkansas (one of the poorest states) during the 60's, our high school had BIG woodworking and metal shops with plenty of machine tools to play with. Wonder how many guys got a CAREER out of what they learned in shop class? Lots, is my guess.

    Walking Eagle
    Last edited by Walking Eagle; 10-05-2012 at 04:27 PM. Reason: add'l thought

  4. #64
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pismo Beach, CA
    Posts
    3,137
    898 I'm curious as to how your "carpet/planisher shrinker/stretcher combo" works. It's a "pounding" operation, right?

    The "bag-of-walnuts" finish is usually removed by rolling the material with an "English Wheel". Harbor Freight offers one, it's on sale this week for $299





    When I grew up in Arkansas (one of the poorest states) during the 60's, our high school had BIG woodworking and metal shops with plenty of machine tools to play with.
    Ditto in southern Indiana at the time. We started "shop" in the seventh grade; drafting, woodworking, metal smithing, leather work, and foundry. I still have the center punch I turned, and the cast aluminum bookends I made. AS I recall, we had to draft the metal part we were going to make, and then used the drawing to make the part (including holding the tolerances). A few years ago Pacific Gas & Electric offered a four year "technical apprenticeship" (paid) through the local community college and out at it's Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant - only two students were interested enough to even show up at the orientation, and the program was canceled. The two students were hired on the spot due to their incentive.
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  5. #65
    Registered User lmo1131's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Pismo Beach, CA
    Posts
    3,137
    Went with .063, which is really hard to pound.
    The more you pound it the harder the metal gets (called work-hardening). That's what the "annealing" process does; returns the metal to a soft(er) state. It's an ongoing process; pound a bit, re-anneal, pound some more, re-anneal.

    There's a trick to annealing aluminum in that link ... using torch soot to coat the metal, and then heating the sheet until the soot burns off. There's a sweet-spot though; too hot and you have a puddle of aluminum. Read the link.

    Now beat it kid!
    Last edited by Lmo1131; 10-10-2012 at 07:44 PM. Reason: sp
    "It is what you discover, after you know it all, that counts." _ John Wooden

    Lew Morris
    1973 R75/5 - original owner

  6. #66
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    22
    so I know that I am new here, but there is a reason my knickname is beater

    i am a metal artist in my spare time, and I am watching this with interest.

    my only advice is anneal, anneal, anneal.

    Hit me offline if you get stuck.

    johnny

  7. #67
    Registered User argent brick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Wine Country, Northern California
    Posts
    461
    Quote Originally Posted by 8ninety8 View Post
    This is where that part came from, a surplus piece, maybe a Quartermaster can tell what it originally was. I was going to close up the hole with a plate, but then it wouldn't have the original design feature of having a bulge on top of motor?
    That is a hand splint. I was a medic for years and saw those things all the time.
    Lynn
    MOA #57883
    Current Ride: 1995 K75 Standard
    Past: 1978 Yamaha XS 750, 1976 BMW R60/6

  8. #68
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Tularosa, NM
    Posts
    666

    The Project. . .

    (1) NOT too much detail.

    (2) When SWMBO suggests that I'm crazy, I can now point to this thread, and say, "No, honey, HE'S utterly demented."

    (3) I think I heard the R90S ask, as it watched the proceedings, "WTF is he doing?"

    Keep on - this is really, really amazing stuff.

    Walking Eagle

  9. #69
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    276
    Coming along nicely. Good work! Please keep posting.

  10. #70
    Registered User melville's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Behind the Redwood Curtain
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by 8ninety8 View Post
    Right forearm starting to look like popeye.
    Time to switch hammering hands. Otherwise you'll be leaning just to maintain a straight line.

    What are you doing for petcocks and gas cap?

  11. #71
    John. jstrube's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Atwater, CA
    Posts
    1,002
    You know what you could do...

    Hollow out the wood tank & put an aluminum one inside. Wouldn't that jack with people's ideals...
    John.

  12. #72
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    22
    Seriously? 12ga? wow. you're a stud. 16ga would have been fine man, but hey, they're your arms.. lol

    what type of al are you trying to work with? 6061? 7005? aluminum has a pretty narrow range to work with before it gets too brittle.

    j
    Last edited by beater; 11-01-2012 at 02:07 AM.

  13. #73
    John. jstrube's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Atwater, CA
    Posts
    1,002
    3003 H14 is what you want. The strength will come from making the tank itself. You could anneal it to make it easier to form, then it will work harden. Check out this guys site:

    http://www.fournierenterprises.com/MetalQA.html
    John.

  14. #74
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    22
    sorry - I misunderstood. I thought I saw that you were using 12ga (.080). 16ga is still overkill, and yes, the strength will come from having the finished shape. The trick will be to make sure you are evenly planished to make sure that you have aligned all the grain and gotten the material as uniform as possible.

    I know you're not there yet, but when it comes to welding on the tabs, remember that that this will be the weakest point of the structure from a vibration and cracking perspective. You will most likely need to form a "dissapation zone" on the mount areas. meaning, slightly thicker stock welding over the tabbed area, (usually 2-3 times the tab surface) to have the tab attached to that, then the plate to the material.

    I am sure you will source a quality welder, but make sure that you discuss heat treatment of the base material around the welded zones "if" they are in load baring areas.

    Do you have a stick or basic mig? I could show you how to make some basic tucking tools that will save you a ton of time if you do, out of drum brake tools. my other recommendation is to get a bag and hammer assortment for plannishing and forming, simple but effective.

    I'll go back to my hole now. Oh, and not only is steel "real", but it's easier too! lol

    j



    Quote Originally Posted by 8ninety8 View Post
    I'm using 63 thousanths, or about a 16th of and inch. Next jump up was 80 thou, and that stuff was thick. 3003 grade. Could'a went with a 5000 grade, more corrosion resistant marine grade, but couldn't see the upside. 3000 grade is pretty malleable. Don't know anything really about doing this. Never done it before. The grades of aluminum start at 1000 and go on up to 7000, each with its own characteristics and applications. Cyclists know a lot about these things. My partner thinks it's crazy and will blow up?, and it's illegal. I said I'll git a fire extinguisher when I go riding. Not sure the tensil strength of the steel tank is much more. Or, we could just sit in a rest home watching TV? This is hard, don't know if it can be done, don't recommend it.

  15. #75
    Monza Blue 1974 R90/6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    444
    Yes, from a totally rational point of view, it might make more sense to buy a tank.

    I've completed a bunch of projects that ended up costing more because I did it myself, but the satisfaction is worth every penny (in most cases).

    I've really been enjoying watching this project.

    Barron

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •