Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 28 of 28

Thread: Planning on renting a bike in Italy

  1. #16
    look out!!! Visian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    ATL/WNC
    Posts
    8,597
    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    In my 16 straight years of riding there, I've only been hassled a few times at airports. I just indicate its a helmet...end of story and I keep walking. I'll wear it on-board as a hat if they push it.
    I have worn my 'stich, boots & helmet onto the plane before to get around the one carry-on rule. got some bizarre looks....

    ian

    .
    Go soothingly through the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.
    __________________________________________________ ________
    '67 Trail 90 || '86 R80 G/SPD+ || '97 F650ST || '00 1150 GS || '06 HP2e

  2. #17
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada and the Alps
    Posts
    3,660
    Quote Originally Posted by Visian View Post
    I have worn my 'stich, boots & helmet onto the plane before to get around the one carry-on rule. got some bizarre looks....

    ian

    .

    So will I if I ever have to. Besides, an Aerostich might make a good North Atlantic survival suit if we ever go down.

    As for airlines, they must be getting pretty desperate. I was charged $25 for one checked luggage by Continental and US Air while flying stateside. Pi$$ed, I asked if they want to charge me for my shorts and socks too.

    They're worried about a 50 pound bag...why don't they worry about overweight passengers. Hey, if they start charging passengers by their weight, it would put those kazillion weight reduction companies out of business.

  3. #18
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    WNY, Further fron NYC, than 6 entire states!
    Posts
    2,128
    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    You can do it Dave...............

    I drove all the way down from Rovereto to Livorno taking nothing but back roads and made it in under 9 hours..................
    It is possible, and you suggested some great roads, some of my favorites. But you have to admit, he can't do the area justice. And many riders don't like these roads, as they are very technical. My guess is less than 10% of even "corner lovers" like this stuff, many prefer open sweepers, they don't know what they are missing IMHO.

    The Tuscan area has some very nice stuff too, not the views, and breathtaking scenery, but ample corners, for even the hard core corner nut.

  4. #19
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada and the Alps
    Posts
    3,660
    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    It is possible, and you suggested some great roads, some of my favorites. But you have to admit, he can't do the area justice.
    Certainly not in three days, but it'll at least have given him a taste and a desire to come back.

    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    And many riders don't like these roads, as they are very technical.
    Hell, the very odd time, I pray for them to end like last summer when I had to get somewhere, but I refuse to take anything but the twistiest of roads...might as well stay home if I don't.

    My run from Gasthof Winkler in Tr?Ă‚polach to Foxi di Vallarsa was a mere 438 km (272 miles), yet it took exactly 9 hours to get there.

    Route if you want to follow along...
    Gasthof Winkler to Sutrio

    Sutrio to Ovaro over Monte Zoncolan

    Ovaro to Ampezzo

    Ampezzo to Navarons - Killer route.

    Navarons to Longarone - Killer route to Barcis.

    Longarone to Levico Terme via Belluno, Feltre, etc.

    Levico Terme to Foxi di Vallarsa over the Kaiserjaegerweg


    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    My guess is less than 10% of even "corner lovers" like this stuff, many prefer open sweepers, they don't know what they are missing IMHO.
    My long time friend and his wife who joined me last June on a rental motorcycle for two weeks now knows the difference.

  5. #20
    tbourque
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by DarrylRi View Post
    I'm fortunate to be able to keep my own bike at a friend's place in Germany. I have a helmet, gloves and an electric jacket stowed with the bike.

    But even without that stuff, it's very difficult to stay under the 50 lb. checked bag limit. I have a big roller duffel bag that can accommodate two saddle bag liners, my boots and riding suit. If I put very much more than that in the bag, it will be over weight. If I had to bring a helmet, I think at that point I'd bite the bullet and pay for a second bag.

    Another possibility is to buy a helmet over there and ship it home.


    When I went over, I carried my helmet on with me along with my riding jacket. I was able to stuff several items in my helmet/bag. This helped keep my weight under 50lbs. and the need for a second checked bag. My helmet bag did fit under the seat in front of me.

    Not knowing, carrying on these essentials was a blessing because my checked bag landed four hours after I did. Since I had my helmet, gloves, jacket, etc. I was able to go to the shop, check my bike and then ride back to the airport and gather the remainder of my gear later.

  6. #21
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    WNY, Further fron NYC, than 6 entire states!
    Posts
    2,128
    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    Hell, the very odd time, I pray for them to end like last summer when I had to get somewhere, but I refuse to take anything but the twistiest of roads...might as well stay home if I don't.
    Couldn't agree more, I am plotting out a loose route for next summer, on the white roads as much as possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    My run from Gasthof Winkler in Tr?Ă‚polach to Foxi di Vallarsa was a mere 438 km (272 miles), yet it took exactly 9 hours to get there.

    My long time friend and his wife who joined me last June on a rental motorcycle for two weeks now knows the difference.
    Sounds about right 45-55 Km/hr is not bad time. It is always amazing to listen to people talk about 500 mile days in the "twisties" and switchbacks in Colorado. The first doesn't exist in Europe on the fun roads, and Switchbacks don't exist on any paved road in the Rockies, I do know of 1 swithcback on the east coast, and a few hairpins, but one ride over the Manghen has more than exist in the entire US.

  7. #22
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada and the Alps
    Posts
    3,660
    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    Couldn't agree more, I am plotting out a loose route for next summer, on the white roads as much as possible.
    If you are ever coming south off the Nassfeld Pass, this is one road in the area worth taking...

    Strada Provinciale Paularo - Upper Road


    Quote Originally Posted by pffog View Post
    Sounds about right 45-55 Km/hr is not bad time. It is always amazing to listen to people talk about 500 mile days in the "twisties" and switchbacks in Colorado.
    I checked my saved GPS track log. One section of that Monte Rest road took me 1h 45m with two short photo stops...to cover 68 kms, yup, 42 miles. Definitely not HD country.

    As for those reports of those 500 mile day twisties, yes, all I can do is chuckle.

  8. #23
    david46
    Guest
    Thanks for additional info, Alex. You have me thinking again about the run to the Alps. Again thanks guy's for the packing tips. The plan is to take the most important gear in our carry on.

  9. #24
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada and the Alps
    Posts
    3,660
    Quote Originally Posted by david46 View Post
    Thanks for additional info, Alex. You have me thinking again about the run to the Alps.
    I really hope you do it. They'll be long days, but once you are back home, you'll have memories and hopefully the desire to go back for more. I wrote an article (see link below) on how to tour the Alps on the cheap.

    Even after all my years touring there, the thought, "I wish more riders could experience this" constantly floats around in my head. Sure enough, last year a long time friend (along with his wife), who just got back into riding in 2009 after a 30 year break, joined me for two weeks on my 2010 Alps Motorcycle Tour. He and his wife were blown away. Needless to say, he isn't thrilled riding around here anymore; he is joining me on part of my 2011 Alps tour.

  10. #25
    david46
    Guest
    Thanks again Alex. I checked out your slide show and maps. Well done! One question,... if you were to rent a bike in Italy would you have a preference?

    Thanks Dave

  11. #26
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada and the Alps
    Posts
    3,660
    Quote Originally Posted by david46 View Post
    Thanks again Alex. I checked out your slide show and maps. Well done! One question,... if you were to rent a bike in Italy would you have a preference?

    Thanks Dave
    After having driven a 1980 BMW R65 with narrow European handlebars (1" rise) for my first ten years of touring the Alps, I sure do. You want an upright seating position with wide handlebars; any large dual purpose/dual sport type of motorcycle.

    One-up, a 650 or 800 will do and two-up, I'd want a 1000 or larger. You want a low 1st gear.

    You definitely want to be able to flat-foot the motorcycle and have a bit of a bend in your knees. Parking lots are one thing, the sloped roads in the Alps are another.

    I have to say that my R1150 GS Adventure is good on most of the roads, except on the very tight uphill hairpins taken on the inside, especially when you are caught off guard and another vehicle is coming down the opposite direction. You need very good low speed control while also being able to handle a tight turn with about a 20+% grade.

    Its unfortunate you cannot see what the grade is like, but the inside of the lower road in the pic is as tight as they get. Thats a narrow road shared with cars...

  12. #27
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    WNY, Further fron NYC, than 6 entire states!
    Posts
    2,128
    Quote Originally Posted by david46 View Post
    Thanks again Alex. I checked out your slide show and maps. Well done! One question,... if you were to rent a bike in Italy would you have a preference?

    Thanks Dave
    Agree on the "GS" style bikes, they are in there element on those roads. I will disagree a little bit on the size, I have spent a lot of time there on a F800ST solo, and an F800GS two up, and the F800GS is my favorite 2 up mount, I prefer it over the R11/R12GS bikes. Combined weight of the wife and I with gear and luggage was probably in the 550-600 lbs range, and the 800 has plenty of torque and power to handle the load.

    Footing is important and the F800GS is tall, I am 6'1" and would not want to be much shorter to ride one. MY guess is you have a 50/50 chance of dropping the bike at least once, even if you have not dropped one state side in years. There are lots of narrow pull offs, to take pictures, narrow roads that may require stopping suddenly, and just a lot of stops, so chances increase significantly that your footing will be insufficient once or twice.

  13. #28
    Biker gunnert's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Catlett, VA
    Posts
    104
    My wife and I rented a GT out of Munich last summer. We traveled with two checked bags. Both were duffel type. One contained 2 ridings suits and helmets. The other had two GT saddlebag liners and a topcase liner (each packed of course). We wore our riding boots.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •