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Thread: winter riding

  1. #1
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    Smile winter riding

    would silk socks under wool socks keep feet dry and warm?

  2. #2
    MOA #24991 Pauls1150's Avatar
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    Dunno specifically, but: I tried a silk liner in my sleeping bag, and while it did keep me warmer, I hated the way it felt. Went back to my cotton liner.
    Wool is bulky, and shrinks with repeated washings... Go to REI or any good skiing/snowmobile supplies store, and get "ski" socks - all the advantages & none of the disadvantages.

  3. #3
    Daily Rider jurgen's Avatar
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    First question: Are your legs warm? Is your torso warm? If you keep your legs and body warm, your feet won't likely get cold. Try Gerbings heated pants.
    I personally don't believe in adding layers around your feet because that generally makes your boots even tighter and cut off circulation.
    YMMV
    J?rgen
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  4. #4
    Raspberry waffles Bob!!! kewlmoose's Avatar
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    I use "smartwool" socks, they wick moisture away from your feet & keep your feet warmer.
    82 R65LS - gone but not forgotten
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    "Oh good, my dog found the chainsaw"
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  5. #5
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ashley12 View Post
    would silk socks under wool socks keep feet dry and warm?
    No. You should be wearing quality motorcycle boots that are the proper size for you when wearing cotton sport socks or a specially designed motorcycle sock, the boots must be comfortable to walk in, and be waterproof.

    I was wearing Alpinestar Tech Roads. They're now discontinued but the replacement is also a great boot.

    This is the current Alpinestar Touring boot.

    I got a super deal on a pair of the BMW Allround boots.

    Here are the boots I now wear.

    If you want motorcycle specific socks, designed to keep the moisture away:

    Here's the socks.

    There are some things you can't do properly with layering. Keeping your feet warm and dry is one of them. Layering is always a trade-off. Where that trade-off is bulk, as already noted above, adding bulk to a properly fitted boot creates additional pressures, regardless of how thin/how little that pressure is, that will sacrifice comfort. If I had a choice to make between my feet being cold or being uncomfortable due to increased pressures on my feet - I'd take cold any day. Your feet can warm up fairly quickly with adequate blood circulation. Your feet cannot recover quickly from the aching created from a boot that's now become too tight.

    If you are riding in the "serious cold", I would consider looking into Gerbings heated socks.
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  6. #6
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
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    Go to the local ski shop, or shop online at a ski/ hiking equipment place. Smartwool as mentioned and several other makers make Wool/polyprop socks that will keep you warm and dry. For MC, get the heavy weight styles, skiers prefer thinner socks as a general rule as our boots are insulated with a heavy liner.

    They are usually about 2/3 the cost of the same socks marketed as MC socks.

  7. #7
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    Where I live coldest is mid 20s. I ride an 08 RT and do not change footwear for winter. BMW all aorund boots w GoreTex and TechSox, boots not too tight, a recipe for cold feet, hot feet and other problems.
    Most important thing is a good electric jacket and handy remote controller, preferably a dual so you have separate glove control if you use electgric gloves.
    I like the WarmN Safe dual remote controller much better than a Gerbings.
    Windproof ants are also important.

    If you ride a more exposed bike or do runs at lower temps you might need other stuff but then you better watch for ice....

  8. #8
    Rally Rat
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    Merlino wool socks - no need to layer

    Smartwool is the same thing. Don't be a cheapskate when it comes to cold weather gear. Good socks can cost $15-20. When you are freezing, you will gladly pay $20 to stop the pain. This is what the ski patrols wear and they are sweating in much colder conditions than I have ever experienced.

    I bought merlino wool long johns and socks years ago for winter bicycling and running. They are expensive but made to last and are not "itchy" like some wool garments can be. The other benefit is they are no warmer than standard cotton products so you don't suffer too much when you go indoors for lunch.

    I don't need to "plug in" until the temperature drops below 30 with merlino underwear and socks.

  9. #9
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveAikens View Post

    There are some things you can't do properly with layering. Keeping your feet warm and dry is one of them. Layering is always a trade-off. Where that trade-off is bulk, as already noted above, adding bulk to a properly fitted boot creates additional pressures, regardless of how thin/how little that pressure is, that will sacrifice comfort.
    Steve is, as usual, right. But only as far as he goes. I tried layering once when I felt compelled to ride a K75T (feet in the wind) from Topeka to Kansas City for a Toys for Tots Ride when it was 8 degrees F.

    After that ride (once I could walk again) I went directly to the store and bought my new winter riding boots: Lace-up, waterproof, Thinsulite lined, 1 size larger than normal.

    Now I can layer socks, have gained insulation from the Thinsulite, can adjust snugness over the instep with the laces, and .

    Sure - I had to buy a pair of boots. But they will last forever since they are not my every-day riding boots.

    Think outside the shoebox!
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  10. #10
    Bluenoser
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    From somebody who lives in a cold climate, cotton is always going to be your enemy. Once it gets damp ( sweat ) it is cold. Either wear a synthetic or wool product as they are much warmer even when damp.

    That's one reason the nylon under a non cotton sock would work fine.
    1971 R50/5 SWB with R75/6 drivetrain
    2013 DL650

  11. #11
    2 Wheeled Troubador oldhway's Avatar
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    Moved this to the "just ridin' " section since it is riding and rider oriented rather than machine/tech. Should have better response here.
    Steve Marquardt, 2004 R1150RT

  12. #12
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    The cheap ski ship polypropoline long underwear, to keep the blood warm on the trip to the legs. Cheaper thick wicking hiking boot socks, and insulated oversize hunting boots Shifting can be a minor issue, bigger toe box. Numb feet affect shifting too.

    Rod

  13. #13
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    You could do what the Inuit and Yupik peoples do to prepare their feet for the winter. Soak your feet in urine..... supposedly it toughens them and makes them less susceptible to cold injury. Also drink straight whale oil; also aids the body in resisting the cold. I've not tried either technique but it seems to work for the Eskimos.
    Kevin Huddy
    Tm Pterodactyl MT Outpost

  14. #14
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBeemer View Post
    You could do what the Inuit and Yupik peoples do to prepare their feet for the winter. Soak your feet in urine..... supposedly it toughens them and makes them less susceptible to cold injury. Also drink straight whale oil; also aids the body in resisting the cold. I've not tried either technique but it seems to work for the Eskimos.
    Boy oh boy, am I glad to know that.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  15. #15
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    Smile

    very funny but very elful thanks to all

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