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Thread: Oil and Filter Change - 2003 R1200C - Please help

  1. #1
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    Oil and Filter Change - 2003 R1200C - Please help

    Hello fellow riders. I am a mechanically challenged rider who is tired of dealing with my BMW dealership in Toronto and decided to do the basic/easy maintenance myself. Only problem is that my cruiser's manual does not have instructions on how to change the oil and oil filer. Can anyone help? Does anyone know of a step by step picture guide, or video that can assist me?

    On another note... Anyone in the GTA area that can recommend a private shop that works on BMW motorcycles?

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    Oil change help

    Check with this guy:

    http://jimvonbaden.com/

    Jim has some nice DVDs that will provide the needed assistance.

    Good luck,

    piperjim
    Piperjim

    '95 R1100RS
    '61 John Deere 3010 LP

  3. #3
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by primechuck70 View Post
    Does anyone know of a step by step picture guide?
    Here is a how-to guide and best of all...it is FREE

    Oilhead Maintenance Manual


    Quote Originally Posted by primechuck70 View Post
    On another note... Anyone in the GTA area that can recommend a private shop that works on BMW motorcycles?
    I'll always suggest doing your own maintenance provided you have the skills not to strip oil drain bolts, etc. I read about stuff like that too often.

    Invest in some good tools and a torque wrench. The costs will be paid in three hours of labour at a shop alone.

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    Registered User 70783's Avatar
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    I agree with globalrider, get a good set of tools and a repair manual (Clymer, Haynes, etc.) for your bike. It is money well spent. Take your time, be patient, this is not rocket science. There is something very satisfying about doing your own maint. and repairs. Good Luck.
    Steve Bechtel
    '99 R1100RS

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    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 70783 View Post
    I agree with globalrider, get a good set of tools and a repair manual (Clymer, Haynes, etc.) for your bike. It is money well spent. Take your time, be patient, this is not rocket science. There is something very satisfying about doing your own maint. and repairs. Good Luck.
    Excellent advice with a caveat or two. I have yet to see an aftermarket manual that addressed the many differences between the R1200 C "Cruiser" and its brother and sister Oilheads of the same vintage. There may be one out there but I haven't found it.

    And, factory manuals or CDs are great for folks who know basic mechanics and need sequences and specifications, but lack detail and narrative.

    In this case it is fairly simple. Get the right oil filter wrench. Get the needed 8mm allen wrench. Find the plug, drain the oil. Find the filter up at the left front corner of the engine. Remove the filter. Wipe up the mess. Fill the new filter with the correct viscosity API SG or SH rated oil. Install the new filter hand tight - then 1/2 turn with the wrench. Reinstall the drain plug with a new crush washer. Be careful to feel the washer start to flatten but don't strip the threads. Add the remainder of the specified amount of oil. Start the engine. Shut it off. Let the oil drain down and then check the level in the sight glass.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

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    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Reinstall the drain plug with a new crush washer. Be careful to feel the washer start to flatten but don't strip the threads.
    That is where someone with no experience should be using a torque wrench.

    People are paranoid that the drain plug will loosen and come out while they are riding, which is why they tend to over tighten things.

    I don't need a torque wrench because I have "the feel", but I always use on any fastener that has a torque value. I even torque my oil filters.

    And to avoid the stuck oil filter syndrome which tends to happen during long winter layaways, I apply a coat of Dow Corning Vacuum Grease (silicone) to the seal.

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    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Excellent advice with a caveat or two. I have yet to see an aftermarket manual that addressed the many differences between the R1200 C "Cruiser" and its brother and sister Oilheads of the same vintage. There may be one out there but I haven't found it.

    And, factory manuals or CDs are great for folks who know basic mechanics and need sequences and specifications, but lack detail and narrative.

    In this case it is fairly simple. Get the right oil filter wrench. Get the needed 8mm allen wrench. Find the plug, drain the oil. Find the filter up at the left front corner of the engine. Remove the filter. Wipe up the mess. Fill the new filter with the correct viscosity API SG or SH rated oil. Install the new filter hand tight - then 1/2 turn with the wrench. Reinstall the drain plug with a new crush washer. Be careful to feel the washer start to flatten but don't strip the threads. Add the remainder of the specified amount of oil. Start the engine. Shut it off. Let the oil drain down and then check the level in the sight glass.
    When I add oil to the filter, I make sure the gasket is well oiled so it comes off easily the next time. I also crank the engine with the clutch in, in gear and the kick stand deployed (so it won't start) to build up oil pressure so I don't have a dry start. The oil level should be around the center dot in the glass with the bike level.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

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    Thanks

    Hi, thank you all for the great advice. It is appreciated it.
    I will start tinkering around and see how it goes. The problem I face, as one of you mentioned above, is that I can't find any specific manuals or pictorials for the cruiser. It seems to be a beast of its own... a beautiful beast of its own. Regardless, I will look at all the material suggested and give it a try. Thanks again. Charlie

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    DoItUrSelf

    Only one additional caveat:
    When you remove the oil filter, look at the top to be sure the rubber gasket comes off with it. It is rare that the gasket stays with the bike, but it has happened a few times...you don't want to end up with two gaskets up there. (Don't forget to put a little oil on the gasket before putting the new filter on, too)

  10. #10
    hotdigitalproof
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    Thanks

    This is still helping fellow riders

    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    Here is a how-to guide and best of all...it is FREE

    Oilhead Maintenance Manual




    I'll always suggest doing your own maintenance provided you have the skills not to strip oil drain bolts, etc. I read about stuff like that too often.

    Invest in some good tools and a torque wrench. The costs will be paid in three hours of labour at a shop alone.

  11. #11
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by osbornk View Post
    When I add oil to the filter, I make sure the gasket is well oiled so it comes off easily the next time. I also crank the engine with the clutch in, in gear and the kick stand deployed (so it won't start) to build up oil pressure so I don't have a dry start. The oil level should be around the center dot in the glass with the bike level.
    And I always fill the oil filter with oil before I put it on. That greatly shortens the cranking. I do the same thing on cars that don't have an angled filter. On many cars (Ford & GM), you can crank the engine without it starting if you hold the gas pedal on the floor. However, I can't do that on my Kia so I can't crank it without it starting.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

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