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Thread: bike aprons (tablier)

  1. #1
    On the Road
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    bike aprons (tablier)

    I just returned from a trip to Paris. It's been a while since I visited and I was amazed to see that almost every scooter and quite a few motorcycles had aprons that cover the riders legs. There were more than a few big beemers (RT's, LT's) with the as well. If you've never seen these check out http://www.bagster.com/en/showroom_liste.php?id_temp=19 and http://www.tucanourbano.it/main/termoscud.aspx

    Anyone know why these haven't caught on in the US? I think it's a brilliant idea... but not so much that I'm willing to start the trend!

    Aaron

  2. #2
    Yarddog
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    Kinda like the skull face masks that the posers wear when it's 95 degrees out... To me, if it's that cold, I have better transportation choices than a motorcycle!!! Also, they seem restrictive, and riding, to me, isn't about riding around in a cocoon! I suppose that some folks might find those advantageous... my initial blush is 'what's the point?'...

  3. #3
    Yarddog
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    I think that if I was gonna be in a situation to use these 'aprons', I'd just put on my chaps and be done with it... thataway, I could reach out easily and quickly to put my feet on the ground...

  4. #4
    weggsa
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    Seems that here we want bikes , over there they must need bikes for a bigger range of use maby?

  5. #5
    Rocky Bow BMW Riders #197 bogthebasher's Avatar
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    Wow those look just plain weird. I guess they would be useful if you live in a climate that is cold and dry or wet, but mostly for me if it is cold enough for something like this then it is also snowing. I think I would have to try one out to really understand the function. On the face of it I doubt I would bother. Sure is interesting what gains popular usage in different parts of the world.
    Ken
    [2008 R1200RT (Biarritz Blue) - Mine]
    [2007 R1200RT (Sand Biege) - Hers]

  6. #6
    Yarddog
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    Quote Originally Posted by weggsa View Post
    Seems that here we want bikes , over there they must need bikes for a bigger range of use maby?
    Never thought about that...you could be right...I'd be REAL concerned about how fast one could deploy their legs on coming to a stop

  7. #7
    Touring Panpsychist Theo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by weggsa View Post
    {snip}...must need bikes for a bigger range of use maby[sic]?
    Well, the cost of owning a vehicle in Europe is quite a bit greater than in the US. Not only is fuel expensive but the taxes to keep a vehicle on the road are dear. Smaller displacement motors and diesel motored vehicles are the least heavily-taxed, IIRC.

    Also, remember that in a number of older European cities (that have roads designed for horse-drawn carts) road space and parking space is at a premium; definitely NOT SUV-friendly.

    Using a motorcycle year round can be a more affordable option for some.
    Last edited by THEO; 05-10-2010 at 01:52 PM.
    Theo

    2009 R1200RT, 2007 Shadow Aero 750 (sold)
    2012 MINI Countryman S, 2004 MINI Cooper S JCW, 2000 BMW 328i

  8. 05-10-2010, 12:54 PM

  9. #8
    rocketman
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    The Moto cops in my area DC and environs, used to have those for cold weather riding. I figured they probably worked well enough, never really considered interfearance problems though. Probably conveinyent on a small scooter or such, keep the pants dry/clean..makes sense for the use.

    RM

  10. #9
    On the Road
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    thanks for the replies

    Well, I didn't expect such a wide range of responses - but great answers/thoughts! I still think they're a good idea and having spent a fair amount of time watching riders at intersections (while my wife browsed art galleries and gardens), they don't appear to hinder stopping at all. They do take an extra step getting re-placed once the rider starts up again.

    It's definitely true that a lot of Europeans use bikes as their only transportation. I talked to a couple folks that told me you'll see almost as many riders in the winter. While I like to think of myself as a 'rider,' I'm not giving up my car (said as I look out the window at pouring rain - did I ride to work? Heck no!).

  11. #10
    High & Dry statdawg's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    I think they are a great idea especially if you ride year round or in an area that is wet such as the UK or the PacWest. Another person would call them a poor mans fairing but for me there is a purpose. They act as a wind barrier, and a shield from the cold.

    Hubert used one for his cold weather travels.
    If one cannot command attention by one's admirable qualities one can at least be a nuisance

  12. #11
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    They used to be more common back in the 70-80s; at least I remember seeing them. When you ride in a place like Alaska they can extend your riding season a fair amount. I have a friend with a R100RT that has had an apron on his bike for almost 30 years; but he has worn the same half-helmet for the same time period. Some folks up here use a blanket to accomplish the same effect. Drape the blanket over your lap and legs while riding and then drape the blanket over the bike to hold in heat while parked for shorter stops. I'd be concerned with the blanket getting tangled in some moving part, but I've never heard of such a thing happening.
    Kevin Huddy
    Tm Pterodactyl MT Outpost

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