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Thread: How to use a bike jack

  1. #1
    asaint
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    How to use a bike jack

    Hi all,

    I'm puzzled by how to use a bike jack to remove the rear tire. If I have the bike jacked up, the bike is balanced from nose to tail. However, when I remove the rear tire, the bike will be unbalanced and nose forward (I assume) off the jack.

    How do I remove the rear tire and not have the bike become unbalanced?

    peace,
    Asaint

  2. #2
    sumran
    Guest
    What type of jack are you planning to use?

  3. #3
    asaint
    Guest
    Randy,

    The jack I have (purchased on Saturday) is in the link below;

    http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...otorcycle+jack

    peace,
    asaint

  4. #4
    Registered User
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    109

    Tie downs.

    You should use tie-downs to secure the bike to the jack.

  5. #5
    asaint
    Guest
    Airhead,

    Can you elaborate on that? The jack manual has you strap the tiedowns Across the bike with each end of the tiedown attaching to the lift.

    The problem with this is;

    1. Not much of a safety feature, bike can still tip
    2. The lower fairings of my 100rt get in the way
    3. Doesn't help for front to back balance (ala - remove the back tire).

    I must be missing something simple here.

    Thanks
    Asaint

  6. #6
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    I had a similar jack i used on my Valkyrie - big pig of a bike

    I would strap around the forks and shocks to the frame of the jack.

    Held it well - the only issue i had was proper placement around the side stand.

    If there are still safety concerns you can put a scissor jack up under the front wheel to eliminate tipping.

    Not to be facetious but if you are only removing the back wheel you can use your centerstand - I am assuming your bike has one.
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  7. #7
    asaint
    Guest
    Semper,

    To remove the rear brake master cylinder on this bike, the rear wheel not only has to be removed, but rolled away from the bike. The centerstand doesn't even come close as the rear wheel well descends behind the rear wheel.

    In thinking this through, I'll need to figure out a way to do 4 point straps - 2 from the front of the bike, and 2 from the rear all attaching to the jack.

    peace,
    asaint

  8. #8
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    Thanks for the information.

    Regarding your strap down requirements, how about 2 sheets of plywood (4 x8) stacked on top of each other and put an eye hook in each corner.

    Wheel the bike into position, put the jack under it - lift up and then tether the bike to the corners, finish lifting up the bike to the neccesary height and then add tension to the straps to support the bike as you work on it.

    Just throwing stuff out there.
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  9. #9
    asaint
    Guest
    Semper,

    That sounds like a great idea. Cheap, simple. hmmm.. wait.

    The jack would then not be flat on the ground. The end under the bike would be elevated above the back end of the jack which would be on the garage floor. Not certain that would be stable?? Anyone try this?

    asaint

  10. #10
    asaint
    Guest
    ok,

    Found a picture of 4-point tie down. Posting it below. This may do the trick. If not, I'll buy some plywood and try that.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
    Administrator 20774's Avatar
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    One way to get at the rear wheel with little clearance when on the center stand is to "kneel" the bike. Remove the front wheel and reinsert the axle. Tie a strap around the axle and the center stand. Now, very carefully, tip the bike onto the lower ends of the exposed forks. Having the gas tank off might be a good idea.

    I've never tried this, but this is supposed to be a way of accessing the rear tire when on the road an you need to fix a flat or something like that.

    It's not a pretty picture, and I'm wondering about the overall stability.
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  12. #12
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    The picture is for a Harley, which has exposed frame for a small lift to access. On an Airhead, this is not the case. It is likely people have wound up picking theirs up by exhaust and/or fairing, with disastrous results.

    For this reason amongst others I wound up with a platform garage lift.

    For just a basic tire removal, with stock centerstand, I have removed axle and dropped wheel out of splines. Then with left hand I tilt bike to right, with ever so slight backwards pressure to keep stand from springing up, and pull wheel with right hand. Bike now rests on front wheel.

    If I am to leave bike this way, or am doing something like a spline lube where you dont want bike tilting back, I simply use a cheap auto scissor lift under the frane crossmember which is near the swing arm axis, and force front wheel to the ground.

  13. #13
    shire2000
    Guest
    I am wondering where the jack is making contact with the bike. On most Airheads the exhaust and oil pan are lower than the frame. this would cause some issues trying to jack up the bike as neither is really strong enough to jack the bike up on reliably. Have you made some sort of support that would sit on the jack and then line up with the frame?

  14. #14
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by asaint View Post
    Semper,

    That sounds like a great idea. Cheap, simple. hmmm.. wait.

    The jack would then not be flat on the ground.
    The jack would be on top of the plywood - the weight of the plywood/jack/bike would keep it flat. I don't see an issue with the jack on the wood.


    Quote Originally Posted by asaint View Post
    The end under the bike would be elevated above the back end of the jack which would be on the garage floor.
    Follow my visual - the plywood is on the ground you drive onto it long ways, so the bike is centered on the 8' side. This leaves you the 4' side to work the jack under and then do your tie offs at the corners. I think it would work.

    After I traded in the Valkyrie and got the Goldwing, i replaced the bike jack and got a drive on ramp that has a removal back plate to drop the rear wheel - highly recommend it if you do your own servicing.

    Would be interested to know what out come ends up being.
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  15. #15
    Manfred
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by 20774 View Post
    One way to get at the rear wheel with little clearance when on the center stand is to "kneel" the bike. Remove the front wheel and reinsert the axle. Tie a strap around the axle and the center stand. Now, very carefully, tip the bike onto the lower ends of the exposed forks. Having the gas tank off might be a good idea.

    I've never tried this, but this is supposed to be a way of accessing the rear tire when on the road an you need to fix a flat or something like that.

    It's not a pretty picture, and I'm wondering about the overall stability.
    My brother - a long time R80RT owner - told me that's how we removed his rear wheel. I am not fond of the idea of having to remove my front wheel to change my rear tire. They don't always wear out at the same time.

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