Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 28 of 28

Thread: Easy motorcycle camping cooking?

  1. #16
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Atlanta 'burbs
    Posts
    5,334

    MREs

    I was wondering what that reference to a chemical heater was. I know they didn't have them for C-Rations and there was not heat for MREs when I was in the army. But that was 1986-90 so I guess they've evolved some since then. I got to try more than enough of the first couple of generations of MRE. The second generation made some nice improvements- that's when they started including the little Tabasco bottles, around 1988. They also added M&Ms to some of them, and this odd little oat-bar that had a consistency/texture like a block of compressed sawdust but had a truly AWESOMELY delicious taste!
    I also remember learning some things about cooking MREs. The early ones had some dehydrated items, the hash-brown-type potato thingee in one meal and a pork patty in another. They could be eaten dry, but could also be reconstituted and even grilled once water was added. I also learned that if one combined the sugar with the contents of the creamer packet then heated the mixture in a spoon over a couple of matches, the result would be a sort of pseudo-cookie. I also really liked those dense baked-in-the-foil-pouch cakes in the MREs and figured out how to make icing for them with the sugar, creamer and the instant cocoa, all mixed together with just enough water to make a spreadable consistency.
    My best MRE experience was during a training excercise in the Mojave desert. I was detailed to a live-fire support detachment so I wasn't in the wargames. The detachment was SO relaxed and laid-back! I worked without supervision (I hope the statute of limitation has run out on that...) and was told that MREs could be had from a cargo trailer over on the edge of our area. I took a case every few days and just ate the parts I liked and plenty of them!
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  2. #17
    look out!!! Visian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    ATL/WNC
    Posts
    8,597
    Originally posted by KBasa
    I traveled with Rob Nye and Sheepshagger this summer. They had a stove called a Pyromid.
    Phil Sikora wrote a great review of the Pyromid stove that was published in the BMW ON and on the BMW MOA CampSite.

    Personally, I prefer the backpacker meals, as others have mentioned. Small, light, crammable in your saddlebags, you only have to boil water, you don't need plates... just eat from the bag.

    Spam is good, too. Slice, sizzle, eat!

    Ian
    Go soothingly through the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.
    __________________________________________________ ________
    '67 Trail 90 || '86 R80 G/SPD+ || '97 F650ST || '00 1150 GS || '06 HP2e

  3. #18
    Registered User TIMRFO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    southwestern Mi
    Posts
    72
    How about baking taters in the cowlings?? going down the road?? or squash. Now I wanna go

  4. #19
    Registered User GS Drifter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    22

    GS Drifter

    IF you're going to cook with a compact stove, I think you're best bet will be some sort of pasta based goolosh. Usually, you can find some freeze-dried stuff -- and some of this stuff is pretty good, and some is not.

    REI sells some of the better freeze-dried stuff. NOW, having said that, if you plan on doing a lot of motorcycle camping, I would suggest that you purchase a case or two of fresh MRE's (Meals Ready to Eat.) You can not go wrong with a good MRE. Each full meal is self contained in a thick polly-plastic bag (for compact storage) and includes main course, fruit, a starch, desert, coffee, fruit drink (coolaid) napkin, salt & pepper etc.

    You can use your compact stove to heat water which you will heat the main course in while still sealed in its pack. Once heated, simply cut or tear at the notch provided, open pouch and enjoy. The MRE will come with a long handle spoon so you can eat right out of the bag.

    Main course choices include: Meat loaf and brown gravey, tuna or chicken a la king, beaf stroganoff, grilled chicken breast, ham steak, terriaki chicken with pineapple and so on. Side dishes can include potato augraten, macaroni and cheese, peaches, apples, fixed fruit, apple sauce etc. Deserts are great and include large cookies, pound cake, brownie etc.

    The storage life of a sealed MRE is anywhere from 6 months to 4 years -- depending on storage Temps. If stored at 70 degrees or below, MRE's should be good for about 2.5 years +-. These are the very same meals that our troops eat in the field. I have consumed many, many MRE's, and I've never had a bad one and they were all filling and flavorfull. Each MRE will provide you with about 3,000 calories. Maybe a bit less. Also, they're not all full of crap chemicals and perservatives either. They're fairly clean in that regard.

    You can find MRE's on the Internet -- there's a company called SO-Pak (or something like that.) Anyway, they may not ship a small order from the factory, but I'm sure you can find a retailer out there. IMPORTANT: Be sure that you are purchasing NEW RUN - CURRENT MRE's. Do not buy military surplus meals. They should be no older than a month or two when you get them

    You can put about 8 meals in a single saddle-bag, and still have room for water and probably your stove.

    Bon Apitite!

  5. #20
    Cruisin' the Rockies! JetDoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Western Nevada
    Posts
    259

    Stupid food tricks

    Originally posted by Timrf
    How about baking taters in the cowlings?? going down the road?? or squash. Now I wanna go
    Back in the day before there were MREs, there were "C" Rations. The main courses came sealed in steel cans. Most of them were nearly inedible when served cold. One of the guys in my squad had the bright idea that if you put the can on the exhaust manifold of a truck for a few minutes, you could heat it up and have a hot meal!

    This worked great until one day, we were called out to an incident and forgot to remove dinner from under the truck hood before responding...

    To make a long story short, lets just say that unopened cans of food may explode when heated, and the combined smell of burned beef stew and diesel fuel can linger for a long time.

  6. #21
    RIDERR1150GSADV
    Guest

    Talking

    While doing my trip out west I had the Mountain House freeze dried foods with me and they were very tasty, especially after a long day in the saddle.
    I did try them all out at home to find out about the taste etc.
    You don't want to be hungry and find out about an meal that bites . I primarely used them as back up food if I was in a remote area or after restaurant closings. Mostly I ate local food and was very happy with that. I use a MSR whisperlite multifuel stove that boils water really quick and as a bonus the gasoline in the fuel bottle can be used in the bike too
    All I had was a pot to boil water in, a spoon and a mug. The mug came in handy to bum a cup of java from my friendly campground neighbors

  7. #22
    Rally Rat paulsibek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    near Los Angeles
    Posts
    388

    Camping Meals

    I'm a little weird when it comes to camping foods.

    I will eat canned stew and chilli cold out of the cans and like it. Got started during many years and miles of ocean sailing. I also like the litle containers og pudding etc. that my wife buys for my kids lunches.

    Bought a little folding Swiss stove that uses a little sugar cube sized fuel thing. It is good enough to boil water on one cube and another will heat up canned food. I've actually boiled water for coffee while lying in my sleeping bag in my tent because this stove system is relatively safe with a small flame.

    You can get self heating MRE's that taste prety good and dehydrated food has become SO MUCH BETTER over the years.

    It seems as I age gracefully, that there is usually a place to eat that makes better food than I can, within riding distance of the campsite, although isn't everything??? I've been teased about how much I bring camping so I have been trying a minimilist thing lately.

    One thing I can recomment heartily is the Folgers coffee bags. Really easy way to make an excellent cup of joe.

  8. #23
    leave my monkey alone LORAZEPAM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    West Salem, OH
    Posts
    2,888
    I will boil the water for ramen noodles, but before I put them in, I add a tuna can sized can of chicken, and let it return to a boil. Then do the ramen noodles with the chicken and the water. It is cheap and easy chicken and noodles. You can take bisquick in a plastic bag, and substitute dumplings from bisquick for the noodles. Oh season as desired.
    Gale Smith
    2009 Versys
    1999 R1100RT

  9. #24
    HODAG
    Guest
    I usually carry some stew (late night hungries) and a couple of things of Zatarains black beans and rice. Real easy to make and cheap. Oh and of course beer, nothin is better cold right out of the can.
    Mark

  10. #25
    Slowpoke & Proud of It! BRADFORDBENN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    State of Confusion
    Posts
    7,799
    I just program in the location of every McD's and Domino's Pizza into the GPS before I leave the house.
    -=Brad

    It isn't what you ride, it is if you ride

  11. #26
    RIDERR1150GSADV
    Guest
    Originally posted by BradfordBenn
    I just program in the location of every McD's and Domino's Pizza into the GPS before I leave the house.
    :yow :yow :yow Where is the adventure in that Brad, unless you count that eating at Mickey D IS an adventure

  12. #27
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Atlanta 'burbs
    Posts
    5,334
    No chemicals in MREs??? Wow, things really do change! The earlier generations were designed to induce a gentle sort of mild constipation. Why, you ask? The fewer traces you leave behind, the less able the enemy is to track you. Even if you bury your waste, the disturbed leaves or dirt can be a clue that troop movements have happened. And the less the troops have to relieve themselves the more agile and mobile their unit will be.

    Sorry if that was TMI for some of you- just tellin' it like it is, or was...
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  13. #28
    Rollin' by the River R1100rtp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    829

    Camping and cooking

    Ditto what most people said about Mountain House meals. Most are pretty good. There's also Alpineaire and Backpacker's Pantry. If you are on a tighter budget, there's always 5min brown rice, with extra water, and add Mrs. Grass's noodle soup.
    Also consider Stovetop stuffing. I take it out of the box, for space consideration. If you stay at KOA's, they usually have Dinty Moore beef stew, pork n beans, etc. I mix brown sugar, cinammon, raisins and crushed pecans in a baggie for a couple of servings of oatmeal. I have the Peak stove. The heat is pretty centralized, so anything you cook without water, would have to be watched closely, and stirred alot. You can also pick up frozen veggies in a service station, heat those and add chicken breast from a can for stir fry.
    Check your supermarket for little pouches of mashed potatoes (different flavors) w/a side of chicken breast (in a can), and it's still easy to pack. If I'm going to be out for a week or more, I pack my foodstuff in a seperate small duffel or pack, and after a few days, stop at a grocery store to replenish. Tortilla shells pack flat, and can be used as bread. (spread with P.B) for breakfast or snack.
    Folgers coffee bags work well. Or you can buy tiny coffee filter bags, complete with a small stick for placing over the cup. Ground coffee can be added to the bag, and pour boiling water slowly through. Allow to steep....a voila!

    Now I'm in the mood to rough it. Hmmm maybe I'll try it again in WV
    Ride Hard, go far, and keep smilin...

    Karol Patzer, Ambassador, Director MOA Foundation
    2008/2014 BMW MOA Rally Chair

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •